Thursday, April 23, 2009

Sam Potts

Sam Potts is equal parts designer, teacher, Twitterer, and possible superhero. He bats left, throws right, and has had fiction rejected by The New Yorker and Harpers. Creative Review in the UK recently featured Potts’s design of the storefront, signage, publications, and packaging of the infamous Brooklyn Superhero Supply Co. He has also done work for the IFC channel, They Might Be Giants, NYU, many publishers of books, the New York Times, and Beck (sort of). Sam Potts Inc. has been an independent graphic design practice since 2002.

In his own words: “I love that there can be an art to nearly everything. I love that Frank Lloyd Wright was shameless. I love that geometry is ancient. I love that the littlest things can make biggest differences, like cufflinks and a pinch of salt and sometimes, five minutes. I love the lowercase 'g' of Electra and the '3' of Walbaum. I love that some things are inexplicable, in fact more things than you’d expect. I love that no expertise is needed to appreciate a well-made thing. I love that you can pretty much always assume there is a better way. I love that anything can seem new. I love that a computer is referred to as a machine. I love that music doesn’t have to mean anything to be beautiful. I love that there are theories about handwriting, the composition of matter, and horse racing. I love the light bulb joke about how many boring people. I love the economy of punctuation. I love the Radiator Building, the Queensboro Bridge, and the Sau Voi Corp. on Lafayette St. I love that anything is interesting if you look at it closely enough. I love the smell of hamburgers that comes in through the window every day, every day.”
(Credit: AIGA NY)

Friday, April 10, 2009

Veronica Ballart

Veronica Ballart's illustrations combine fashion with the intimate world of the individual, and with it, create a dialogue between public and secret life. Travel, music, nature, fashion and everyday life are Ballart's inspiration. With very sensitive figurative drawings and soft, blurred and watery colouring, Veronica Ballart has created a feminine and romantic style. The use of delicate objects such as feathers, origami or make-up, combined with her beautiful fragile characters, creates a melancholic beauty with an emotive storytelling aesthetic. Her work has appeared in fashion magazines such as Plaza, Damernas Värld and Fashion Tale.